Courses

Fall 2017 Courses

REL/ASIA/GS 95-10 Muslim Asia in the 21st Century: Religion, Culture, Politics  4 credits (HU) 
Despite an overwhelming focus on Islam in the Middle East, most Muslims in the world now live in South and Southeast Asia. In this course, we will explore the ongoing evolution of these societies as they deal with novel opportunities and challenges of globalization in the 21st century. We will also investigate how modern Muslim identities emerge from a complex interplay between religions, culture and politics.    
Professor Hussain T, R; 1:10 - 2:25  p.m. 

ART 001-011 Art and Architecture History: Ancient to Medieval CRN 43721  4 credits (HU) CBE Global
Survey of art and architecture around the globe, from the world's earliest artistic and architectural production through the 14th century. European, Middle Eastern, African, Asian and Central and South American works are covered. The course also serves as an introduction to the vocabulary, concepts, and methods of art and architectural history.  
Professor Thomas T, R; 7:55 - 9:10 a.m.

AAS 003-10  Intro to Africana Studies CRN 43508  4 credits  (SS) ART, CBE Diversity  
An interdisciplinary examination of the roots, culture, and politics of the modern black world through study of classic works in Africana Studies with emphases on the continuities among African peoples worldwide and the social forces that have shaped contemporary black life in Africa and the Americas.  
Professor Kart   M, F; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 

POLS 003 - Comparative Politics 4 credits (SS) CBE Global
The political systems of foreign countries; approaches to the study of comparative politics.
Nandini Deo M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.

ART 125-010 Art and Architecture of Africa from Colonial to Contemporary Times 4 credits (HU) CBE Global
This course is structured around case studies of art and architecture from early traditions up through the present. The focus is on cultural production, religious art and architecture (local as well as Christian and Muslim traditions), craftsmanship, style, materials, trade, and international exhibition of art objects in Museums. The literature draws from art historical, anthropological, and historical analyses as well as museum studies. Students should be prepared to attend Museums/galleries during the semester. 
Professor Kart M, F; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m.

REL, GS 140-10  Globalization and Religion CRN 43246  4 credits (HU) CBE Global, Writing Intensive
This course examines the complexity of globalization and its multi-layered impact on religious identity and piety. Though comparative in methodology and historical framework, the class will give special attention to Islam and Hinduism in South Asia. Topics include: European colonialism; Orientalism and its legacy; religious nationalism; Islamophobia; and the Internet and mass media.  
Professor Rozehnal T,R; 2:35-3:50 p.m.

ARAB 001 010 Elementary Arabic I CRN 41313  4 credits (HU) CBE Global
The general objective of this course is to familiarize students with the sounds and the letters of Arabic, along with basic communication skills. Students are required to use Arabic in class discussion. Attendance and class participation are necessary to achieve the above-stated goals. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the elementary level. 
M,F; 11:10 – 12:25 p.m. and W; 11:10 -12:00 p.m. Staff

ARAB 011 010 Intermediate Arabic I CRN 41314   4 credits (HU)
Development of communication skills and cultural awareness through reading materials and viewing films. Grammar is presented in context. Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills, and on the use and cultural aspects of the language through authentic materials. Students learn how to communicate effectively and appropriately while satisfying their intellectual curiosity to learn about the civilization and culture, current as well as historical dimensions.
M,W,F; 10:10 – 11:00 a.m. Staff


Spring 2017 Courses

REL, GS, ASIA 247-10  Islamic Mysticism  CRN   4 credits  (HU) CBE Global, WI (Writing Intensive)
Sufism, the inner or ‘mystical’ dimension of Islam, has deep historical roots and diverse expressions throughout the Muslim world. Students examine Sufi doctrine and ritual, the master-disciple relationship, and the tradition’s impact on art and music, poetry and prose  
Professor Rozehnal   T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 

ARAB 002 – 010 Elementary Arabic II CRN 11231 4 credits (HU) CBE Global
Continuation of ARAB 001. Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills and use of the language. Students develop ability to communicate with native speakers on a variety of everyday topics; introductions, descriptions of people and things, disseminating information, stating preferences, describing locations, etc. Students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand authentic materials on familiar topics, as well as recognize and understand various grammatical rules and their application in context, and expand their cultural awareness. 
M,W,F 11:10-12:00 p.m. and T; 12:10 – 1:00 p.m.  Professor Hamouch
 
ARAB 012 – 010 Intermediate Arabic II CRN 11232 4 credits (HU) CBE Global
Enhancement of communication skills, proficiency, competence, and use of the language. Students will enhance and develop their ability to understand the spoken word and to converse on a variety of topics; discuss, narrate, and read authentic materials that cover a variety of issues and topics; e.g., educational, cultural, and factual; write short paragraphs; recognize and use grammatical rules in context; and expand cultural awareness through class discussion and reading materials. Frequently taught in the target language to emphasize and reinforce classroom use. Students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the upper intermediate level.
M,F; 12:10 – 1:00 p.m. and T; 9:20 – 10:10 a.m.  Professor Hamouch
 

Fall 2016 Courses

ART 001-101 Art and Architecture History: Ancient to Medieval CRN 42732  (HU)   4 credits
Survey of art and architecture around the globe, from the world's earliest artistic and architectural production through the 14th century. European, Middle Eastern, African, Asian and Central and South American works are covered. The course also serves as an introduction to the vocabulary, concepts, and methods of art and architectural history.  Professor Kart
T, R; 7:10 – 8:25 p.m.
 
REL, GS, ASIA 077-10  The Islamic Tradition CRN 43759 (HU)   4 credits 
A thematic introduction to Islamic history, doctrine and practice. Topics include: Qur’an; prophecy and sacred history; ritual practices; community life; legal interpretation; art and aesthetics; mysticism; politics and polemics.  Professor Rozehnal
M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.
 
REL, GS 140-10  Globalization and Religion CRN 43765 (HU)   4 credits 
This course examines the complexity of globalization and its multi-layered impact on religious identity and piety. Though comparative in methodology and historical framework, the class will give special attention to Islam and Hinduism in South Asia. Topics include: European colonialism; Orientalism and its legacy; religious nationalism; Islamophobia; and the Internet and mass media.  Professor Rozehnal
M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m.
 
GS, REL, ASIA 145-10  Islam And The Modern World CRN 43715 (HU) CBE Global  4 credits 
Examines how numerous Muslim thinkers-religious scholars, modernists, and Islamists-have responded to the changes and challenges of the colonial and post-colonial eras. Special emphasis is placed on the public debates over Islamic authority and authenticity in contemporary South Asia.  Professor Hussain T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
 
ARAB 001-10  Elementary Arabic I CRN 41368 (HU) CBE Global  4 credits 
The general objective of this course is to familiarize students with the sounds and the letters of Arabic, along with basic communication skills. Students are required to use Arabic in class discussion. Attendance and class participation are necessary to achieve the above-stated goals. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the elementary level.  Staff
M, W, F; 11:10 - 12:00 p.m.
 
ARAB 190-10  Special Topics I CRN 43997 (HU) CBE Global  1-4 credits 
Departartment permission required. Professor Staff
 
ARAB 231-10  Third Year Arabic I CRN 43904 (HU) CBE Global  4 credits 
Enhance fluency, particularly conversational Arabic. Emphasis on comprehension of written and spoken language. Dialogue, reading, and analysis of texts to enhance critical thinking, as well as promote mastery of the language. Immersion in overall increase in fluency. Advanced level geared towards command and comprehension of conversation and written texts, textbooks, and media (i.e., newspaper, magazine).  Staff
M, W, F 12:10 - 1:00 p.m.
 
AAS, FREN 312-10  Modernity in the Maghreb CRN 44258 (HU) CBE Diversity, (Writing Intensive)  4 credits 
Emergence of the modern self through a comparative study of textual as well as visual representations of postcolonial subjects by male and female writers and film makers. Study of the way the sociopolitical context of countries such as Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia informs the constitution of subjectivity within a multicultural and multilingual community. Issues such as patriarchy, nationalism, colonialism, post colonialism, identity, gender, and Islam in North African literature and film from Franco-Arab traditions.  Professor Berrada M, W 12:35 - 1:50 p.m.
 

Spring 2016 Courses

REL, GS, ASIA 247-10 Islamic Mysticism (4 CR; HU/ WI (Writing Intensive)
Sufism, the inner or ‘mystical’ dimension of Islam, has deep historical roots and diverse expressions throughout the Muslim world. Students examine Sufi doctrine and ritual, the master-disciple relationship, and the tradition’s impact on art and music, poetry and prose.
Professor Rozehnal

POLS 201-010 Democracy & Dictatorship in South Asia (4 CR; SS)
Theories of democracy and democratization explored in the South Asian context. Relationship of democracy to economic development and identity considered. How do historical legacies of colonialism and conflict shape contemporary outcomes.
Professor Deo T,R 1:10 pm - 2:25 pm
 
ARAB 002-010 Elementary Arabic II (4 CR; HU)
Continuation of ARAB 001. Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills and use of the language. Students develop ability to communicate with native speakers on a variety of everyday topics; introductions, descriptions of people and things, disseminating information, stating preferences, describing locations, etc. Students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand authentic materials on familiar topics, as well as recognize and understand various grammatical rules and their application in context, and expand their cultural awareness.
Professor Hamouch M, W, F 10:10 am - 11:00 am 
 
ARAB 012-010 Intermediate Arabic II (4 CR; HU)
Enhancement of communication skills, proficiency, competence, and use of the language. Students will enhance and develop their ability to understand the spoken word and to converse on a variety of topics; discuss, narrate, and read authentic materials that cover a variety of issues and topics; e.g., educational, cultural, and factual; write short paragraphs; recognize and use grammatical rules in context; and expand cultural awareness through class discussion and reading materials. Frequently taught in the target language to emphasize and reinforce classroom use. Students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the upper intermediate level.
Professor Hamouch M, W, F 11:10 am - 12:00 am
 
ARAB 95 Spoken Arabic

Professor Hamouch M, W 9:10 am - 10:00am


Fall 2015 Courses
TEACHING STAFF
ARAB 001 - Elementary Arabic I (4 CR; Course Attributes: CBE Diversity, CBE Global, Humanities Requirement)
The general objective of this course is to familiarize students with the sounds and the letters of Arabic, along with basic communication skills. Students are required to use Arabic in class discussion. Attendance and class participation are necessary to achieve the above-stated goals. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the elementary level.
M,W 10:10-11 am 
CMT1 R 10:45-11:35 am

ARAB 011 - Intermediate Arabic I (4 CR; Course Attributes: CBE Diversity, CBE Global, Humanities Requirement)
Development of communication skills and cultural awareness through reading materials and viewing films. Grammar is presented in context. Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills, and on the use and cultural aspects of the language through authentic materials. Students learn how to communicate effectively and appropriately while satisfying their intellectual curiosity to learn about the civilization and culture, current as well as historical dimensions.
M,W,F 11:10-12 am 
Prerequisites: Undergraduate level ARAB 002 Minimum Grade of TR
 
ARAB 231 - Third Year Arabic I (4 CR/3 CR Lecture Hours; Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement)
Enhance fluency, particularly conversational Arabic. Emphasis on comprehension of written and spoken language. Dialogue, reading, and analysis of texts to enhance critical thinking, as well as promote mastery of the language. Immersion in overall increase in fluency. Advanced level geared towards command and comprehension of conversation and written texts, textbooks, and media (i.e., newspaper, magazine).
M 2:35-3:50 pm 
Restrictions: May not be enrolled as the following Classifications: Freshman 
 
PROFESSOR KHURRAM HUSSAIN
REL 146 - Islam in South Asia (4 CR/3 CR Lecture Hours; Course Attributes: CBE Global, Global Citizenship Prog Course, Humanities Requirement)
A survey of the dynamic encounter between Islamic and Indic civilizations. Topics include: Islamic identity, piety and practice; art and aesthetic traditions; inter-communal exchange and conflict; the colonial legacy; and the politics of contemporary religious nationalism.
TR 2:35 - 3:50 pm 
Restrictions: May not be enrolled as the following Classifications: Freshman

Spring 2015 Courses
PROFESSOR MATT FISCHER
ARAB 002-010 Elementary Arabic II (4 CR; HU)
Continuation of ARAB 001. Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills and use of the language. Students develop ability to communicate with native speakers on a variety of everyday topics; introductions, descriptions of people and things, disseminating information, stating preferences, describing locations, etc.  Students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand authentic materials on familiar topics, as well as recognize and understand various grammatical rules and their application in context, and expand their cultural awareness.  
 
ARAB 012-010 Intermediate Arabic II (4 CR; HU)
Enhancement of communication skills, proficiency, competence, and use of the language. Students will enhance and develop their ability to understand the spoken word and to converse on a variety of topics; discuss, narrate, and read authentic materials that cover a variety of issues and topics; e.g., educational, cultural, and factual; write short paragraphs; recognize and use grammatical rules in context; and expand cultural awareness through class discussion and reading materials. Frequently taught in the target language to emphasize and reinforce classroom use. Students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the upper intermediate level.
 
PROFESSOR KHURRAM HUSSAIN
REL, ASIA, GCP 145-010 Islam and the Modern World (4 CR; HU)
Examines how numerous Muslim thinkers-religious scholars, modernists, and Islamists have responded to the changes and challenges of the colonial and post-colonial eras.  Special emphiasis is placed on the public debates over Islamic authority and authenticity in contemporary South Asia.  
May not be enrolled as Freshman 
 
PROFESSOR ROBERT ROZEHNAL
**CANCELED** REL, ASIA 247-010 Islamic Mysticism (4 CR; HU)
Sufism, the inner or ‘mystical’ dimension of Islam, has deep historical roots and diverse expressions throughout the Muslim world. Students examine Sufi doctrine and ritual, the master-disciple relationship, and the tradition’s impact on art and music, poetry and prose.  
May not be enrolled as Freshman 
 
PROFESSOR TAIEB BERRADA
FRE 398-010 The Algerian War in Francophone Literature and Film (4 CR)
This course deals with Francophone works by Postcolonial authors and filmmakers from France and Algeria. We will examine the historical context at the beginning of the war, representations of the conflict itself and the aftermath of independence, nation-building narratives, the role of women and the complexities of postcolonial identity formation as experienced by the French, by Algerians and the Algerian Diaspora in France. Following the long overdue release of archives on the Algerian war in France in the early 2000s, this course will attempt to synthesize old and new ideas, question assumptions on the war and on “French Muslims’” rights, explore issues of torture, repressed memories and trauma, in order to develop an understanding not only of what happened then but also of what is going on in Algeria and France today.  
Must be enrolled as Graduate, Junior, or Senior 

Fall 2014 Courses
PROFESSOR MATT FISCHER
ARAB 001-010 Elementary Arabic I (4 CR) 
ARAB 011-010 Intermediate Arabic I (4 CR)
ARAB 231-010 Third Year Arabic I (4 CR)
ARAB 300-010 Apprentice Teaching (1-3 CR)
 
PROFESSOR KHURRAM HUSSAIN
REL 149-10 Modern Islamic Ethics (4 CR; HU)
This course will focus on developments in Islamic thinking and ethics that emerge from the modern encounter between Muslim societies and the West.  We will discuss Islamic modernism and fundamentalism through short primary texts from a variety of modern Muslim thinkers.  
 
PROFESSOR MICHAEL RAPOSA
REL 5-10 Spiritual Exercises in Religious Traditions (4 CR; HU)
Explores a variety of religious disciplines developed in various traditions, ranging from the practice of yoga and the martial arts to various forms of prayer, meditation, and asceticism. 
 
PROFESSOR ROBERT ROZEHNAL
REL/GCP 148-10 Islam Across Cultures (4 CR; GS attributes; HU)   
Explores the Muslim world’s diversity and dynamism in multiple cultural contests-from the Middle East and North Africa, to Asia and America-through literature,ethnography and films.  Topics include: travel and trade networks; education;women and gender; Islam and cultural pluralism; colonialism; and identity politics. 

Spring 2014 Courses
PROFESSOR CHRISTINE KALLENY
Elementary Arabic II
Intermediate Arabic II
Third Year Arabic II
 
MLL 096-011 Musical Ecstasy in the Arab World
In the tradition of the Arabs, poetry is born of song, and song is in turn the ultimate expression of intense erotic joy and longing. This course introduces students to the captivating musical phenomenon of the Arabs, understood as Tarab or musical "enchantment." Tarab implies the experience of rapture, the experience of being "carried away" by a musical performance, whether you are the listener or the musician. Students will explore the history and the development of "Aghaanii Tarab" (Tarab songs), as they get "carried away" by the rich and pervasive musical legacy of Egypt, Syria and Lebanon in the modern age. Among the "classical" composers and performers students shall study and experience are the legendary Egyptian singer Um Kalthoum, the innovative Egyptian composer and musician Mohammed Abd al Wahab, the Egyptian Nightingale Abd Al-Halim Hafez, and the iconic musicians of Lebanon, Fairuz and the Rahbani brothers. Students will also encounter the music of contemporary musicians and performers with the aim of exploring the ways in which Tarab tradition continues to evolve in the wake of westernizations and globalization. 
 
PROFESSOR TEHSEEN THAVER
Rel/Asia 77 The Islamic Tradition (4 CR; HU)
A thematic introduction to Islamic history, doctrine and practice. Topics include: Qur'an; prophecy and sacred history; ritual practices; community life; legal interpretation; art and aesthetics; mysticism; politics and polemics. 
 
Rel/Asia 247 Islamic Mysticism (4 CR; HU)
Sufism, the inner or ‘mystical’ dimension of Islam, has deep historical roots and diverse expressions throughout the Muslim world. Students examine Sufi doctrine and ritual, the master-disciple relationship, and the tradition’s impact on art and music, poetry and prose. 

Fall 2013 Courses
PROFESSOR TEHSEEN THAVER
REL 197 The Qur'an (4 CR)
This course will examine the early history, form, style, and interpretation of the Qur’anic text. It will also investigate the Qur’an beyond its function as a bounded literary text by examining the ritual, experiential and material encounters between the Qur’an and Muslim communities. After this course students will have acquired a close familiarity with multiple translations of the Qur’an as well as an understanding of how it operates within societies. In addition, through a critical engagement with categories like “scripture,” “translation” and “interpretation” students will be introduced to larger debates on hermeneutics and material culture within the study of religion. (HU) Course Attributes: Asian Studies
 
REL 296 Religion and Culture in Iran, 1500-Present (4 CR)
This course will use a region specific approach to evaluate the ways in which religion and culture are conceptualized and enacted in particular contexts. It will focus on the region of Iran from the time of Safavid empire to the modern Islamic Republic. It will include the topics Shi’ism, Sufism, intellectual and sectarian movements, encounters with colonialism, art and architecture, music, and literature. Through these topics students will be introduced to the question of conflicting interpretations of religion, the nature of national identity, and the way in which religion is redefined by the modern nation-state. (HU) Course Attributes: Global Studies and History
 
PROFESSOR CHRISTINE KALLEENY
ARAB 001 Elementary Arabic I (4 CR; HU; Course Attributes: CBE Diversity, CBE Global, Humanities Requirement )
The general objective of this course is to familiarize students with the sounds and the letters of Arabic, along with basic communication skills. Students are required to use Arabic in class discussion. Attendance and class participation are necessary to achieve the above-stated goals. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the elementary level. 
Intermediate Arabic I (4)
ARAB 011 Intermediate Arabic I (4 CR; HU; Course Attributes: CBE Diversity, CBE Global, Humanities Requirement )
Development of communication skills and cultural awareness through reading materials and viewing films. Grammar is presented in context. Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills, and on the use and cultural aspects of the language through authentic materials. Students learn how to communicate effectively and appropriately while satisfying their intellectual curiosity to learn about the civilization and culture, current as well as historical dimensions. Prerequisite: ARAB 002 or equivalent. 
 
ARAB 231-010 Third Year Arabic II (4 CR/3 CR Lecture Hours; HU; Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement )
Enhance fluency, particularly conversational Arabic. Emphasis on comprehension of written and spoken language. Dialogue, reading, and analysis of texts to enhance critical thinking, as well as promote mastery of the language. Immersion in overall increase in fluency. Advanced level geared towards command and comprehension of conversation and written texts, textbooks, and media (i.e., newspaper, magazine).
 
MLL 090-011Narrative Journeys in the Middle East and Africana  (4 CR; Attributes: Humanities Requirement)
This course introduces freshman to a variety of narratives in different literary genres from the Arab world. The organizing theme of this course is that of the journey, whether it be a physical trek through the desert or metaphorical one such as an inward psychological quest. All of the sources selected for this course are translated from Arabic into English. Students will encounter narratives written by both male and female writers from various parts of the Arab world and from different periods of Arabic literary history. CAS FYS Only. 

Spring 2013 Courses 
PROFESSOR HEATHER COFFEY
ART 195: Introduction to Islamic Art and Architecture (4 CR)
This course examines the development of art and architecture throughout the Islamic world from the 7th-20th centuries. Topics include the origins of Islam and the formative patronage of the Umayyads and Abbasids; calligraphy and the arts of the book; "hybrid" objects and architecture produced during the Crusades; the art and architecture of the Ottomans, Safavids, Mughals, and Qajars; nineteenth-century Colonialism and Orientalism; and contemporary photography, film, and new media by Muslim artists.
Recommended: One of Art 1/Arch 1/Art 2/Arch 2, or a university level course on Islam.
 
ART 295: Art and Architecture Across the Medieval Mediterranean, c. 1050-1350 (4 CR)
This seminar course examines the Mediterranean basin as a field of study and an arena of Christian-Muslim contact, which produced art and architecture that continues to challenge traditional understandings of medieval aesthetics. We will assess locations of intense artistic interaction across the region, such as the Iberian Peninsula; Norman Sicily; Amalfi, Pisa, and Venice; Fatimid Egypt and North Africa; and the Crusader States. Themes will include theories of “Mediterraneanism,” the circulation of luxury objects and diplomatic gifts, the appropriation of rival aesthetics due to warfare, trade or mercantilism, “hybrid” objects, and architectural Orientalism.
Prerequisite: Art/Arch 1, or a university-level course on Islam, or permission of instructor.
 
PROFESSOR CHRISTINE KALLEENY
ARAB 002: Elementary Arabic II (4 CR; HU)
Continuation of ARAB 001. Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills and use of the language. Students develop ability to communicate with native speakers on a variety of everyday topics; introductions, descriptions of people and things, disseminating information, stating preferences, describing locations, etc. Students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand authentic materials on familiar topics, as well as recognize and understand various grammatical rules and their application in context, and expand their cultural awareness. Prerequisite: ARAB 001 or equivalent. 
 
ARAB 012: Intermediate Arabic II (4 CR; HU)
Enhancement of communication skills, proficiency, competence, and use of the language. Students will enhance and develop their ability to understand the spoken word and to converse on a variety of topics; discuss, narrate, and read authentic materials that cover a variety of issues and topics; e.g., educational, cultural, and factual; write short paragraphs; recognize and use grammatical rules in context; and expand cultural awareness through class discussion and reading materials. Frequently taught in the target language to emphasize and reinforce classroom use. Students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the upper intermediate level.
Prerequisite: ARAB 011 or equivalent. 
 
ARAB 232: Third Year Arabic II (4 CR; HU)
(Independent Study)
Continuation of Third Year Arabic I. Emphasis on comprehension of written and spoken language. Dialogue, reading, and analysis of texts to enhance critical thinking, as well as promote mastery of the language. Immersion in overall increase in fluency. Advanced level geared towards command and comprehension of conversation and written texts, textbooks, and media (i.e., newspaper, magazine). 
 
DR. SANGAY MISHRA
POLS 298-010 - Cultural Diversity and the Law (4 CR; SS)
This course interrogates the ways in which legal decision making accommodates cultural and religious differences. Besides United States, the course will look at France and India to analyze the experiences of African Americans, American Indians, Muslims, Sikhs and other minorities. The course will engage with the following questions: Should law take specific cultural and religious traditions into account while deliberating on legal disputes? Should law be sensitive to cultural claims? 
 
PROFESSOR KHURRAM HUSSAIN
REL/ASIA 146 – Islam in South Asia (4 CR; HU)   
A survey of the dynamic encounter between Islamic and Indic civilizations. Topics include: Islamic identity, piety and practice; art and aesthetic traditions; inter-communal exchange and conflict; the colonial legacy; and the politics of contemporary religious nationalism. 
 
REL/GS 296 – Religious Nationalism(s) in Global Perspective (4 CR; HU)
In the last three decades, there has been a marked rise in the number of social and political movements that explicitly merge their political aims with their religious commitments.  What is nationalism, and is religious nationalism more "religious" or more "nationalism?"  Is religious nationalism similar across different religious groups or are there peculiar forms associated with particular religions?  We will investigate cases from South Asia, Africa and America. 
 
PROFESSOR CHRISTINE LUCKRITZ: Religion Studies
REL/HIST 196 – Christianity and Islam in Late Antiquity (4)
Monday/Wednesday, 11:10 a.m. – 12:25 p.m.
Considers the continuities, differences, and relations between Christians and Muslims in late antiquity, including the role of violence in each religion’s self-understanding. Situates the interactions between the communities within their surrounding cultures.  Emphasis on primary texts. (HU)
 
PROFESSOR ROBERT ROZEHNAL
REL/ASIA 247 – Islamic Mysticis (4 CR; HU) Junior Writing Intensive
Sufism, the inner or 'mystical' dimension of Islam, has deep historical roots and diverse expressions throughout the Muslim world. Students examine Sufi doctrine and ritual, the master-disciple relationship, and the tradition's impact on art and music, poetry and prose. 
 
PROFESSOR BRUCE WHITEHOUSE
REL/ANTH 396 – Anthropology of the Muslim World (4 CR; SS)
Students will use in-depth ethnographic case studies to investigate what  Muslim populations in different contexts share as well as how they differ. An exploration of social theory and anthropological methods will  illuminate the tensions between Islam as a universal faith and as a source of religious meaning to peoples living in particular times and places.  No prior knowledge of or exposure to Islam is required. 

Fall 2012 Courses
PROFESSOR HEATHER COFFEY
ART 1Art History: Ancient and Medieval (4 CR; HU)
No department permission required, no prerequisites. Enrollment capped at 100.
Survey of major monuments of art and architecture from the prehistoric caves of Lascaux and Altamira through the Gothic cathedrals of Chartres and Notre Dame of Paris, along with highlights of art and architecture of the non-Western civilizations of Africa, India, and China. Work seen in the context of cultural, historical, and technological developments.
 
PROFESSOR KHURRAM HUSSAIN
REL/GS 296 Modern Islamic Thought: Between Modernity and Tradition (4 CR; HU)    
This course will focus on developments in Islamic thinking that emerge from the modern encounter between Muslim societies and the West. While there is a long history of interaction between the West and the East, the modern period is marked by widespread social upheaval in the Islamic world in the face of Western political and economic expansion. Many Muslim thinkers, in a wide variety of contexts, engaged with the political and ideological challenge represented by the West by attempting to reform traditional Islam. The reforms they advocated touched not only on purely theological matters but also sought to redefine what it meant to be a Muslim and to reconfigure Muslim societies. In short to modernize Islam. In this course we will look at the writings of many such thinkers, including but not limited to Sayyid Ahmad Khan in India, Muhammad Abduh in Egypt, and Jamal al-Din al-Afghani, among many others.
 
PROFESSOR CHRISTINE KALLEENY
ARAB 001 Elementary Arabic (4 CR)
The general objective of this course is to familiarize students with the sounds and the letters of Arabic, along with basic communication skills. Students are required to use Arabic in class discussion. Attendance and class participation are necessary to achieve the above-stated goals. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the elementary level.
 
ARAB 011 Intermediate Arabic I (4 CR; HU) 
Development of communication skills and cultural awareness through reading materials and viewing films. Grammar is presented in context. Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills, and on the use and cultural aspects of the language through authentic materials. Students learn how to communicate effectively and appropriately while satisfying their intellectual curiosity to learn about the civilization and culture, current as well as historical dimensions. Prerequisite: ARAB 002 or equivalent. 
 
ARAB 300 Apprentice Teaching
Instructor, permission required.
 
MLL 090 Sex and Sexuality in Arabic Literature (4 CR)  Dean Permission Required
Explore the joys, pains, and perils of sexual experience represented in a selection of classical to contemporary Arabic writings by male and female writers from diverse regions of the Arabic-speaking world. Read, in translation, a number of genres—novels, short stories, poetry, folklore—and develop a critical understanding of the social/cultural context of writings about sexuality in the Arab world. Study themes and topics as war and feminine sexuality, religion and homosexuality, prostitution, and modes of erotic voyeurism.
 
PROFESSOR SANGAY MISHRA
POLS/GS 297-010 Muslim Immigrants in the West (4 CR; SS) 
A comparative analysis of the United States and Europe (France and Britain).This course looks at Muslim religious, cultural, social, and political incorporation in these countries. 
 
PROFESSOR ROBERT ROZEHNAL
REL/GCP 148 Islam Across Cultures (4 CR; HU)
Explores the Muslim world's diversity and dynamism in multiple cultural contests from the Middle East and North Africa, to Asia and America, through literature, ethnography, and films. Topics include: travel and trade networks; education; women and gender; Islam and cultural pluralism; colonialism; and identity politics. 

Spring 2012 Courses
PROFESSOR KHURRAM HUSSAIN
REL /GS 196 Comparative Religious Ethics: Modern Moral Issues
Modernity presents those with religious commitments with ethical concerns that are peculiar to this age. Many of these concerns have to do with the institution of the modern nation-state. How have thinkers within the three major Abrahamic traditions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) handled these concerns? With the nations-state as our focus, we will discuss issues such as secularism, the legitimacy of state-based war and non-state violence, the status of nationalism, the viability of democratic governance, freedom of expression and the ‘problem’ of pluralism, the status of women,  and the nature (and limits) of the relationship between religious practice and civic participation.
 
REL/IR/GS 295 Critics of Modernity
Modernity is a contested concept. In this class, we will look at certain paradigmatic critiques of modernity from some major thinkers of the 20th century. These thinkers will include Mahatama Gandhi, Alastair MacIntyre, Sayyid Qutb, and Hannah Arendt, among many others. What are the different conceptions of modernity that these authors are contesting? Is there a distinction between ‘modernity’ and ‘western modernity’? Is religion (or particular religions) inherently incompatible with modernity? Can one be both religious and modern? We will deal with these and other similar questions throughout the semester.
 
PROFESSOR HARRY NEALE
REL/HISTORY 197 History, Religion, and Empire in the Early Islamic Period (600-1200 CE)
This course begins with an historical overview of pre-Islamic Arabia and the Near East, including discussion of the major political powers (i.e. the Sassanids and Byzantines) and the religions of the area (e.g. Eastern Christianity, Judaism, and Zoroastrianism).  We then examine the advent of Islam in Arabia and the subsequent spread of the faith throughout the Near East, North Africa, the Iberian Peninsula, and Central Asia to the Mongol Conquests of the thirteenth century.  Students explore the early Islamic empires of the Umayyads and the Abbasids as well as the significant cultural and theological developments of this formative period.
 
REL/GS 296  Jihad in the Islamic Tradition
This course examines the fundamental Islamic concept of Jihad from the advent of Islam in the seventh century to the present.  Students study and analyze relevant primary sources such as Islamic scripture, historiography, literature, as well as contemporary media, such as film and websites, in order to understand how Muslims have interpreted and continue to interpret Jihad and its role in their faith and history.
 
PROFESSOR YOUSHAA PATEL
REL 198 Islam: From Mysticism to Law
This course showcases the vast and dynamic range of Islamic religious thought over time and place.  It traces how Muslims transformed the foundational texts of the Quran and prophetic traditions into a corpus of religious doctrine and practice that infused the everyday life of those within its orbit – from the development of a sophisticated body of jurisprudential theory to a rich body of spiritual and mystical literature that sought to beautify the inner character of the seeker of divine union and love.
 
REL 298 Muhammad and Prophecy
This interdisciplinary seminar examines the life of Muhammad, who ranks among the most influential persons in world history.  After probing the nature and meaning of prophecy, this course surveys Muhammad’s life in detail, including his spiritual practices, spousal relations, and approach to politics, war and interfaith relations, all while drawing a portrait of early Arab social, cultural, political, and economic life.  The course also explores the problem of succession after Muhammad’s death, which spawned the split between Sunni and Shia Muslims.
 
PROFESSOR TAIEB BERRADA
ENGL/MLL/WS 398 Arab Women in Postcolonial Francophone Literature and Film (taught in English)
Explores works by and about women from Postcolonial societies through Arab Francophone Literature and Film. We will examine the way these women negotiate their postcolonial identities as they relate to issues of colonialism, gender, war, patriarchy, immigration, exile, culture, religion and language. Look at textual as well as visual practices in Francophone novels by Assia Djebar, Etel Adnan, Malika Mokkedem, Leïla Sebbar and Andrée Chédid and films by Yamina Benguigui and Nadir Mokneche. 
 
FR 298/398 The Harem in French and Francophone Literature and Film (taught in French)
Explores representations of this forbidden and secret feminine space, the harem, starting with French theater from the 17th century all the way to 20th-21st century Francophone North African novels and film. We will attempt a comparative study between the French and Francophone traditions and will be looking at the harem as a visual as well as textual feminine space from which narratives emerge and the extent to which they constitute a counter-discourse that questions dominant power structures. 
 
PROFESSOR CHRISTINE KALLEENY
Arabic 2
Arabic 12

 
ENGL/MLL/REL 198 Arabian Love from Pre-Islam to the Present
This course explores the rich and variegated tradition of erotic poetry within the Arab literary heritage, a tradition which has not only shaped and influenced the literary legacy of medieval Europe but which comes alive each day in the popular love songs played in the taxi cabs in Cairo and other cities of the Arabic-speaking world.  In this course, students will encounter a plethora of erotic themes, motifs and genres and study their development across the centuries and in the different regions of the Arab world. All texts are translated into English. Music will play an important role in bringing the poetry we are reading to life. No prior background in Middle Eastern studies is required.
 
PROFESSOR FATMA EL-TURKY
Arabic 198

Fall 2011 Courses 
PROFESSOR  FATMA EL-TURKY
ARAB 197 Third Year Arabic (4 CR; HU)  
Enhance fluency, particularly conversational Arabic.  Emphasis on comprehension of written and spoken language.  Dialogue, reading and analysis of texts to enhance critical thinking, as well as promote mastery of the language.  Immersion and overall increase in fluency.  Advanced level geared towards command and comprehension of conversation and written texts, textbooks, and media (i.e. newspaper, magazine).  
 
ARAB 297 Fourth Year Arabic (4 CR; HU) 
Enhance fluency, particularly conversational and written Arabic.  Emphasis on reading and analysis of texts to enhance critical thinking, as well as promote mastery of the language.   Immersion and overall increase in fluency.   During the majority of the class period, students will be expected to communicate with classmates and the instructor in Arabic and to make presentations in Arabic pertaining to current events.  Increased use of Arabic during classroom instruction.  Students expected to come prepared to present something that utilizes the language: poems, personal stories or experiences, current event articles, etc.
 
ARAB 300 Apprentice Teaching (4CR; HU)  
 
PROFESSOR CHRISTINE KALLEENEY
ARAB 001-11 Elementary Arabic (4 CR; HU) 
The general objective of this course is to familiarize students with the sounds and the letters of Arabic, along with basic communication skills.  Students are required to use Arabic in class discussion.  Attendance and class participation are necessary to achieve the above-stated goals.  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the elementary level.  
 
ARAB 011 Intermediate Arabic (4 CR; HU)  
Development of communication skills and cultural awareness through reading materials and viewing films.  Grammar is presented in context.  Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills, and on the use and cultural aspects of the language through authentic materials.  Students learn how to communicate effectively and appropriately while satisfying their intellectual curiosity to learn about the civilization and culture, current as well as historical dimensions.  Prerequisite: ARAB 002 or equivalent.  
 
MLL 090 The Arabic Novel in Translation (4 CR; HU)
Explore the relationship between the development of the Arab novel and the challenges faced by the Arab world in the 20th century.  The Arab novel is a genre new to the region and a rich field in which to explore how writers in the region grapple with problems of patriarchy, war, exile, and identity.  Explore these questions through a selection of novels chosen for their exceptional literary merit as well as a variety of secondary texts.    
 
PROFESSOR KHURRAM HUSSAIN
REL/ASIA 146 Islam in South Asia (4 CR; HU) 
A survey of the dynamic encounter between Islamic and Indic civilizations.  Topics include:  Islamic identity; piety and practice; art and aesthetic traditions; inter-communal exchange and conflict; the colonial legacy; and the politics of contemporary religious nationalism.   
 
REL/GS 296 Religious Nationalism(s) in Global Perspective (4 CR; HU) 
In the last three decades, there has been a marked rise in the number of social and political movements that explicitly merge their political aims with their religious commitments.  This “public religion” takes many different forms, from peaceful participation in democratic politics to violent insurgencies against the status quo.  Religious nationalism is one form of such politicized religion. What is nationalism, and is religious nationalism more “religious” or more “nationalism”?  Is religious nationalism similar across different religious groups or are there peculiar forms associated with particular religions?  How is it similar to, or different from, other forms of totalizing political movements of the 20th century, like fascism and communism?  Is this a “rebellion” against modernity, as some scholars have pointed out, or the “ugly underbelly” of modernity, as others have argues?Interestingly, this has also been the period of rapid globalization, with increasing movements of people, goods, money and ideas across international borders.  In fact, many religious nationalist movements have strong ties to diasporic populations.  A globalizing economy also complicates the existing relationship between identity and geography.    What is the relationship between the rapid rise of religious nationalism and expanding globalization?  We will investigate cases from South Asia, the Middle East, and from America. 
 
PROFESSOR HARRY NEALE
REL/MLL/GS 196 Introduction to Islamic Art and Architecture (4 CR; HU)  
This course will introduce students to the art and architecture that Islamic culture has produced.  Students will learn how aspects of local pre-Islamic indigenous culture were adapted to express an Islamic worldview in a voice familiar to the local population.  Particular attention will be given to mosques and calligraphy with some discussion of music, ceramics, and miniature painting.  Reference will also be made to the Islamic influence on non-Islamic architecture (e.g. the Spanish mudéjar style).  
 
REL/MLL 297 Introduction to Persian Literature (4 CR; HU)
This course will introduce students to the long and rich literary tradition of the Persian language.  The history of Persian literature spans a period of over one thousand years-from the earliest poetry and prose encouraged by the Samanids, the first Islamic dynasty to make Persian its court language, up to the modern era.  Students will read from a variety of genres in translation: poetry; epic; prose; and from the modern period, the novel and short story.  Persian literature has developed as an unbroken tradition so that an awareness of the earliest Persian poetry and prose informs all subsequent Persian literature, including modern works.  Persian literature also had a profound influence on the development of many other Islamic languages (e.g. Ottoman Turkish, Chagatai, and Urdu).
 
PROFESSOR ZIAD MUNSON
SSP/GCP 105 The Social Origins of Terrorism (4 CR; SS)
What is terrorism and its causes?  This course explores the roots of terrorism sociologically.  It offers critiques of common theories of terrorism and presents several sociological lenses for better understanding the phenomenon.  In doing so, students are able to explore the social, historical, political, and religious roots of terrorism as well as some of the key questions terrorism raises for all of us as citizens.  Course materials for the class include sociological analyses, articles from the popular media, movies and documentaries, and actual texts that have been influential in mobilizing terrorist violence in recent years.  By the end of the course students are expected to have a better understanding of the beliefs of terrorists, the conditions that produce and sustain terrorism, and the students themselves play as national and global citizens in addressing the threat of terrorism. 

Spring 2011 Courses
PROFESSOR FATMA EL-TURKY
Arabic 12  Intermediate Arabic II
Arabic 191 Arabic Special Topics II
Arabic 197 Third Year Arabic II
Arabic 297 Fourth Year Arabic II
 
PROFESSOR CHRISTINE KALLEENY
Arabic 002 Elementary Arabic II
 
MLL 198 Arabian Love from Pre-Islam to the Present
A survey of the development of the rich and variegated themes and topoi of the Arabian tradition of love poetry from Pre-Islam to the present. Encounter love of all varieties: from the desert ode of the Bedouin tradition to the mad, self-debilitating love of the ‘Udhris to the dalliant, playful, and often hedonistic variety.
 
PROFESSOR KHURRAM HUSSAIN
REL/GS/IR 295 Modern Islamic Thought: Between Modernity and Tradition (HU)
This course will focus on developments in Islamic thinking that emerge from the modern encounter between Muslim societies and the West. While there is a long history of interaction between the West and the East, the modern period is marked by widespread social upheaval in the Islamic world in the face of Western political and economic expansion. Many Muslim thinkers, in a wide variety of contexts, engaged with the political and ideological challenge represented by the West by attempting to reform traditional Islam. The reforms they advocated touched not only on purely theological matters but also sought to redefine what it meant to be a Muslim and to reconfigure Muslim societies.  In short, to modernize Islam. In this course we will look at the writings of many such thinkers, including but not limited to Sayyid Ahmad Khan in India, Muhammad Abduh in Egypt, and Jamal al-Din al-Afghani, among many others.  
 
PROFESSOR YASIE IBRAHIM
REL 196 Qur'an and Prophetic Traditions
This course is designed to introduce students to Islamic sacred texts, the Qur’an and Prophetic Traditions. Students will be acquainted with the structure and meanings of the Qur’an in addition to studying different schools of interpretation past and present. The course also focuses on investigating the role of the Qur’an and Prophetic Traditions in shaping Islamic beliefs and religious practices. A special attention will be given to the concerns of Muslim minorities in the West in addressing questions related to the Qur’an and Prophetic Traditions. The course also provides a comparison between some Qur’anic themes and those in other religious writings especially the Bible.
 
REL 296 Jihad: Holy War and Just War
This course focuses on studying the historical development of the religious views of peacemaking and warfare in the Islamic tradition. The course will help students to compare the Just War tradition in the West with the Jihad doctrine in Islam. In addition, students will have the opportunity to read and analyze classical and modern Muslim writings on the subject.
 
PROFESSOR PEDRAM PARTOVI
HISTORY/GS 196 Introduction to the Modern Middle East
This course seeks to connect up the current global conflict pitting an "emancipatory" Western liberalism against the "anti-democratic" forces of Islam to a longer history of representations of the global order and the place of the "West" and the "Middle East" within that order.  Students will gain a familiarity with the history of the modern Middle East (the so-called "heartland of Islam"), concentrating on the Levant, Mesopotamia, the Arabian peninsula, Egypt, Turkey, and Iran, from the late 18th century to the present. 
 
REL/GS/HIST 298 Post-Revolutionary Iran
This course will examine in detail the major political and social transformations of Iran over the past thirty years.  With the Iranian Revolution of 1978-79 as the starting point, readings and discussions will concern four major themes of political Islam, the Iran-Iraq War, the "youth bulge," and mass exile and emigration that have most contributed to this recent history.

Fall 2010 Courses
PROFESSOR FATMA EL-TURKY
Arabic 1
Arabic 197
Arabic 297
 
PROFESSOR CHRISTINE KALLEENY
Arabic 1
Arabic 11
MLL 090-12 Narrative Journeys in the Middle East and Africa (4 CR; HU) 
This course introduces freshman to a variety of narratives in different literary genres from the Arab world. The organizing theme of this course is that of the journey, whether it be a physical trek through the desert or metaphorical one such as an inward psychological quest. All of the sources selected for this course are translated from Arabic into English. Students will encounter narratives written by both male and female writers from various parts of the Arab world and from different periods of Arabic literary history.
 
PROFESSOR KHURRAM HUSSAIN
REL/ASIA 146 Islam in South Asia (4 CR, HU) 
A survey of the dynamic encounter between Islamic and Indic civilizations.  Topics include: Islamic identity; piety and practice; art and aesthetic traditions; inter-communal exchange and conflict; the colonial legacy; and the politics of contemporary religious nationalism.
 
PROFESSOR PEDRAM  PARTOVI
REL/HIST/GS 195 Early Modern Muslim Empires  (4 CR; SS) 
This course examines the rise and fall of the "Gunpowder Empires": the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal polities that dominated much of the Muslim world for several centuries after the decline of the Mongols and their immediate successors. Relations between the three empires, often characterized by intense rivalry, will be a central concern.  However, attention will also be paid to the links that bound together their courts and the aspects of daily life common to the subject populations.
 
Rel/Hist 296 Popular Film in Egypt, India and Iran (4 CR; SS) 
This course examines popular film and film-related activities in Egypt, India, and Iran from 1945 to the present. Central to class discussions will be how films engage with their audiences as well as how they engage with the various nation-building projects aimed at transforming the lives of people in these three countries during the period under study. Largely unexamined structural and thematic connections between the film cultures will also be addressed. Some comparisons will in turn be made with Hollywood films.
 
PROFESSOR ROBERT ROZEHNAL
REL/ASIA 247 Islamic Mysticism (4 CR; HU; Junior Writing Intensive) 
Sufism, the inner or 'mystical' dimension of Islam, has deep historical roots and diverse expressions throughout the Muslim world.  Students examine Sufi doctrine and ritual practices, the master-disciple relationship, and the tradition's impact on art and music, poetry and prose, piety and politics.

Spring 2010 Courses
PROFESSOR NAGIHAN HALILOGLU
REL 195 (GS 195) Islam: Texts and Practice (4 CR; HU)
This course will be a study of Islamic practices with a view to tracing their genealogy to the basic texts of Islam (the Koran and the hadith) on the one hand and the experiences of postcoloniality, modernization and secularization on the other. There will be an introduction to the Koran and the hadith with a focus on issues such as gender, human rights and the social contract. In the view of these texts, we will explore the methodologies available to Muslims when responding to contemporary challenges. 
 
REL 296 (ENGL, GS, MLL 296) Contemporary Muslim Literatures (4 CR; HU)
This course will investigate contemporary literature from Islamic countries, as well as writers who come from Islamic communities in Europe and the US. Themes like gender, nationalism, the postcolonial predicament and cosmopolitanism will be explored to see how we can conceptualize a “Muslim self” or a “Muslim narrating voice”. We will look at how Muslim writers make use of genre conventions of the memoir and the historical novel and how they are positioned in the Muslim world in particular and in the international world of letters. Texts considered will include Alaa Al Aswany’s The Yacoubian Building, Shelina Zahra Janmohammed’s Love in a Headscarf, Fadia Faqir’s Pillars of Salt, Orhan Pamuk’s Istanbul and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis. 
 
PROFESSOR KHURRAM HUSSAIN
REL 295 (GS, IR 295) Modern Islamic Thought: Between Modernity and Tradition (4 CR; HU)
This course will focus on developments in Islamic thinking that emerge from the modern encounter between Muslim societies and the West. While there is a long history of interaction between the West and the East, the modern period is marked by widespread social upheaval in the Islamic world in the face of Western political and economic expansion. Many Muslim thinkers, in a wide variety of contexts, engaged with the political and ideological challenge represented by the West by attempting to reform traditional Islam. The reforms they advocated touched not only on purely theological matters but also sought to redefine what it meant to be a Muslim and to reconfigure Muslim societies. In short to modernize Islam. In this course we will look at the writings of many such thinkers, including but not limited to Sayyid Ahmad Khan in India, Muhammad Abduh in Egypt, and Jamal al-Din al-Afghani, among many others. 
 
PROFESSOR TAIEB BERRADA
FREN 398 Modernity in the Maghreb (taught in French)
In this course we will be looking at the emergence of the modern self through a comparative study of textual as well as visual representations of postcolonial subjects by male and female Francophone writers and film makers. We will investigate how the sociopolitical context of countries such as Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia informs the constitution of subjectivity within a multicultural and multilingual community. We will look at issues such as patriarchy, nationalism, colonialism, postcolonialism, identity, gender and Islam in North African literature and film from Franco-Arab traditions. The course will include novels by Albert Memmi, Driss Chraïbi, Assia Djebar, Tahar Benjelloun, Tahar Djaout and films by Gillo Pontecorvo, Moufida Tlatli, Nadir Mokneche among others.